THE MARYLAND CAMPAIGN OF 1862: Pt 16

THE MARYLAND CAMPAIGN OF 1862: THROUGH ARKANSAS EYES

After daybreak on Sunday the 14th of September fighting could be heard on South Mountain as the Union Forces forced their way toward Turner’s and Fox’s Gaps and took Crampton’s Gap. The smoke from this fighting was visible from Walker’s position on Loudoun Heights.

During the 14th the rest of the division was further placed to prevent escape from Harper’s Ferry. Also at daybreak Captain French with three parrott guns and two rifled pieces of Branch’s battery were sent to Loudoun Heights. General Stonewall Jackson was informed of this by signal flag. The enemy seeing the signaling opened fire on Walker’s cannon emplacements. At 1:00PM Walker ordered return fire on Union Artillery position on Bolivar Heights and in two hours silenced an eight gun battery near the Barbour House. Cannon fire from McLaw’s position on Maryland Heights and General A.P. Hill’s artillery of Jackson’s Command joined in the artillery duel through the afternoon. The Union positions had been bombarded and smoke rose from the town at sunset. Walker’s losses during the afternoon were 1 killed and 3 wounded.

On the Monday the 15th of September at about 5:00AM the full Confederate Barrage kicked off from Jackson’s position on School House Ridge, McLaw’s position on Maryland Heights, Walker’ position on Loudoun Heights and a new position of some of Walker’s cannon on the open ground along the west base of Loudoun Heights near the suspension bridge. It lasted until a white flag appeared by 8:00AM. All Confederate fire ceased by 8:30AM and at 9:30AM official word was received of the surrender.

Some of the Arkansas Boys sneaked across the Shenandoah and got new boots and shoes.

About noon word came that Lee needed the army to reassemble at Sharpsburg. Later in the afternoon with 3 days of rations the 3rdwas on the road behind Jackson’s Division headed north.

At about 2:00AM on the Tuesday the 16th of September the divisionreached Shepherdstown, VA, and commenced the crossing of the Potomac River ford with bonfires for illumination.

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About Civil War Reflections

Vernon has been a Civil War buff since childhood, but had been inactive in Civil War history for over two decades. However, in the early 1990s his interest was rekindled after watching Ken Burns’ “Civil War Documentary” on PBS. He particularly became interested in the Battle of Antietam (Sharpsburg) and decided to learn more about this epic struggle.
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