THE MARYLAND CAMPAIGN OF 1862: Pt 26

THE MARYLAND CAMPAIGN OF 1862: THROUGH ARKANSAS EYES

I have walked the part of the charge route of the 3rd Arkansas and 27th North Carolina that is still open to the public and have placed small Confederate flags in Mumma’s Lane to commemorate their valor many times.

Since I reenact with the 3rd Arkansas I feel a special affinity with this original Civil War unit. I portray Pvt. Littleton C. Duke of E Company, the Champagnolle Guards. Champagnolle was a small community in Union County near the town of El Dorado, AR.

Pvt. Duke and I have connections. He was born in Alabama and so was I. He moved to Arkansas and so did I. His wife’s name was Nancy and so is mine.
Pvt. Duke also was one of the men that joined the company when it was first raised in 1861 and he was one of the men that were surrendered at Appomattox at the end of the war. I have often wondered what scenes of death, suffering and destruction he witnessed and how it affected him after the Civil War.

I guess the big question I have about Pvt. Duke is how long did it take to get back to Arkansas and what means of transportation was available. That is definitely a research project in itself.

Well, after the Battle of Antietam Marse Robert’s (Gen. Lee’s) men crossed the Potomac back into Virginia and was joined by a host of the men that didn’t go with them into Maryland.

The Confederate Army of Northern Virginia was reorganized in October, 1862, and the 3rd Arkansas was brigaded with Hood’s ole Texas Brigade. The Union Army’s Commander, General McClellan was relieved and General Burnside was promoted to command, butall of this is better left for another campaign story.

Advertisements

About Civil War Reflections

Vernon has been a Civil War buff since childhood, but had been inactive in Civil War history for over two decades. However, in the early 1990s his interest was rekindled after watching Ken Burns’ “Civil War Documentary” on PBS. He particularly became interested in the Battle of Antietam (Sharpsburg) and decided to learn more about this epic struggle.
This entry was posted in Arkansas, Maryland, Re-enactment and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s