SACRED GROUND: Part 5

SACRED GROUND: Part 5

After eating downtown we toured Don Troiani’s Gallery of Civil War Limited Prints. I was wishing I had enough money to buy one. They were all so historically accurate and full of action.

We visited some of the local tourist shops and in one I saw a gray Confederate wide brim hat that I just couldn’t do without. So I bought it so I would have some shade from the sun while touring the battlefield. Also, it made me feel as if I were honoring the Confederate soldiers that fought here. In this same shop I bought a very small Confederate Battle Flag that was attached to a very small wooden dowel.

Next we visited the National Cemetery where Lincoln gave the Gettysburg Address and we read the words of that famous and inspiring speech. We then drove west out of Gettysburg and finally found the entrance to Confederate Avenue.

We drove pass many historical markers signifying the positions of artillery and infantry units situated along Confederate Avenue, which in 1863 was the Confederate Line.

Virginia monumentFinally, we came to the Virginia monument.  It is the largest of the Confederate Monuments at Gettysburg.  At the base there are people etched in stone representing the professions of all the Virginia soldiers from farmers to engineers to doctors.  At the very top of the monument is a statute of Robert E. Lee on his horse, Traveler.

Nancy and I took each other’s picture In turn in front of the monument. Then we began to walk from the monument across the field’s the same way the Virginia Troops did on Wednesday July 3rd, 1863 in Pickett’s Charge.

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About Civil War Reflections

Vernon has been a Civil War buff since childhood, but had been inactive in Civil War history for over two decades. However, in the early 1990s his interest was rekindled after watching Ken Burns’ “Civil War Documentary” on PBS. He particularly became interested in the Battle of Antietam (Sharpsburg) and decided to learn more about this epic struggle.
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