Civil War Transcendence, part 14

§    A Novel of Time Travel

I stopped moving, dropped my arms; and bowed my head.

“Please God. What is going on? I don’t understand. This can’t be happening.”

My heart was beating like a rabbit caught in a trap.  It brought up acid into my throat; I coughed it back down.

Hugging myself again, I thought, “What if I have really, really gone into some kind of time warp.  I don’t really want to live in another age. I like it in the 21st century. I love my wife. I love my house, car and job. I love my life.”

I put my hands out in front of me again and wobbled further off the right side of the road until I touched a big tree.  I was abruptly fatigued.  The adrenalin had worn off.  I put my back to the tree, hugged myself and slid down into a sitting position.

I asked out loud, “Where am I really?”

I was so tired and distraught that I went into a daze.  I huddled down putting my arms between my legs, my head on my knees and just shook for about 5 minutes.

As my body came back to some semblance of normal, I was able to get a little warmer.  I was still cold, but I was no longer shaking.

Mad Hatter road sign

1930’s Disney artist Dave Hall: “All Roads Lead to the Mad Hatter”

I knew I had to find out not only where I was, but when I was.

If I was where I thought I was (near Sharpsburg, MD) I needed to make sure. To find out, I could do one of three things: I could continue northeast on this road to Smoketown; return to the farm trail and go north to the Joseph Poffenberger farm; or go southwest on this road to the Hagerstown Pike and then into Sharpsburg.

That is, if I am near Sharpsburg.

I picked the latter. I figured it would be less likely that I would be attacked by dogs that possibly inhabited the local farms.

So, off I went at a fast paced stride.

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About Civil War Reflections

Vernon has been a Civil War buff since childhood, but had been inactive in Civil War history for over two decades. However, in the early 1990s his interest was rekindled after watching Ken Burns’ “Civil War Documentary” on PBS. He particularly became interested in the Battle of Antietam (Sharpsburg) and decided to learn more about this epic struggle.
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