Camden Expedition: May 2, 1864

NEAR LITTLE ROCK, Ark.

As the sun rose on May 2nd, the Union column was still on the road.  They had no rations, so there was no reason to stop.

About 3:00pm, the column entered the Benton Road, and the soldiers recognized they were close to their camps in Little Rock.

General Steele left the column under the command of General Salomon and rode ahead to Little Rock.

Cracker Line illustration

Illustration: Waiting for the Cracker Line

Close to the city, General Steele encountered the supply wagons, guarded by the 54th Illinois, on their way to Steele’s hungry army. The wagons met the column at Bayou Fourche.

General Salomon stopped the forced march, and rations were quickly distributed to the troops. With full bellies for the first time since leaving Little Rock, the army had a restful night.

On the Confederate side, Texas Brigade Commander Colonel Randal was buried with full military honors.

Confederate Major Elliott, after reporting to Overall Commander Kirby Smith the position of the Union army, put his men back in the saddle and doggedly followed the Union column toward Little Rock. He never got a chance to attack the rear guard. The Yanks outnumbered his unit, and they provided very good protection for the column.

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About Civil War Reflections

Vernon has been a Civil War buff since childhood, but had been inactive in Civil War history for over two decades. However, in the early 1990s his interest was rekindled after watching Ken Burns’ “Civil War Documentary” on PBS. He particularly became interested in the Battle of Antietam (Sharpsburg) and decided to learn more about this epic struggle.
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